Time for new running shoes?

As I set off on a bright Saturday morning for an easy four mile run, a route I have completed with ease on numerous occasions over the years, I quickly found myself struggling somewhat. The dull ache I had felt in my knee in recent weeks resurfaced, along with a throbbing pain in both shins.

I persevered for a mile or so, stopping now and then to give my shins a little rub, thinking my legs just needed to warm up. However, I quickly begun to think back on my runs of late and realised this was not right. I have struggled for weeks, with achy shins and knee – putting it down to being tired or just being a wimp.

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With the London Marathon training due to kick in shortly, I knew I needed to buy a new pair of running shoes, but it was just one of those things I just had not got round to doing. So, I was plodding along with the same trainers I had trained and ran the London Marathon in, back in 2017 – giving very little notice to the state of the shoes or how they were affecting my performance.

What became clear today was that my running shoes were well and truly dead. They had died some time ago, but I was too preoccupied to realise and replace them. And the consequence was that they were starting to cause me issues.

So how do you know when it is time for a new pair of trainers?

Is the mileage on your current running shoes too high? After researching this afternoon I have realised that mine were well passed the recommended distance. Depending on your running style, body weight and running surface your running shoes need to be replaced every 300-400 miles. This year alone I have hit 300 running miles, and this does not even begin to factor in the training I completed back in 2017: before, during and after the London Marathon. Just shy of two years of running miles!! It is no wonder, therefore, that I am starting to struggle with my well worn pair.

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Feeling pain? Muscle fatigue, shin splints and pains in your joints could mean that the cushioning has worn out on your trusted runners. Not only have I been feeling rather fatigued, but today’s running (and a few others recently too) caused pain in my shins and a week off of running due to issues with my knee. Pain box ticked!

Do your trainers fail the twist test? If you hold your shoe at both ends and twist the shoe the sole should remain firm. Older shoes that no longer have support will twist easily. Mine did not have an issue here, but that is not to say that they were still suitable to run in.

Are the treads worn out? Whilst stretching on the track at running club this week another member spotted the well worn patch on the sole of my shoe. Running with worn soles is a complete no no. I have been well aware of the issues with mine for some time, but carried on running regardless. I should know better than to allow my trainers to get to the current state and continue training. So why I am surprised with my performance this morning I don’t know!!

Alternating running shoes is often advised. Running with numerous pairs of trainers will mean that half way through the life cycle of one pair they will become a reference to help you notice when the old pair are ready to be replaced. I always have multiple pairs of trainers, which a rotated on a regular basis. My only problem this time was that it took me a while to pick up on that reference. Instead I put my performance, the aches and pains, and the fatigue down to over training and exhaustion.

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If, like me, you have problems keeping track of the mileage there are a number of things you can do to keep track. Either simply write the date you started training on the label or log the shoes on the app you use to record your runs. Both my Garmin and Strava have the ability to enter this information and keep track of mileage.

So, as I tell myself off for being so blase with the most vital piece of equipment a runner could need, I lay my well worn trainers to rest and begin the hunt for a new pair to get me on the road to the London Marathon 2019.

 

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